BBL | Social Accountability in the Water Sector: Two Illustrative Examples

March 15, 2016
J7-044

The Global Partnership for Social Accountability, the World Resources Institute and the Water Global Practice of the World Bank invite you to a BBL:

Social Accountability in the Water Sector: 

Two Illustrative Examples

 

Tuesday, March 15, 2016
12:30 –2:00pm
Room J7-044
701 18th Street, NW, Washington, D.C.
A light lunch will be served. 

 

 

 

Presenters
Carole Excell
Project Director, The Access Initiative
World Resources Institute

Elizabeth Moses
Research Analyst, The Access Initiative
World Resources Institute

Discussant
Pier Mantovani
Lead Water and Sanitation Specialist
World Bank

Chair
Marcos Mendiburu
Senior Social Development Specialist
World Bank

The presenters will outline two projects that illustrate the benefits and challenges of using social accountability strategies to strengthen citizen engagement and citizen-driven accountability in order to address critical water governance challenges in developing countries.  The Strengthening the Right to Information for People and the Environment (STRIPE) project works with local communities and civil society in Indonesia and Mongolia to utilize their right to information to address industrial sources of water pollution and improve their environmental health. STRIPE showcases the need to provide more useful and comprehensive public environmental information proactively to members of the public and supports constructive engagement around expanding access to information and pollution prevention with government, private sector, and civil society stakeholders.

WRI is also working to develop a global mapping platform, Global Forest Watch – Water, to help users access watershed information, understand watershed risks and identify appropriate strategies for forest restoration that also improve watershed management. WRI is piloting the tool for use by civil society groups in India and Indonesia to promote novel and improved water protection strategies and expand opportunities to engage government and financial institutions around natural infrastructure solutions. The BBL will give insights in how these projects are approaching social accountability, and also presents how these form part of The Access Initiative, an international network of civil society that promotes access to information, participation, and justice in environmental decision-making for which WRI acts as secretariat.

BIOGRAPHIES

Carole Excell
Carole Excell is the Project Director, The Access Initiative at the World Resources Institute working on access to Information, public participation and access to justice issues around the world. Previously she was the Coordinator for the Freedom of Information Unit of the Cayman Islands Government in charge of ensuring the development and effective implementation of the Cayman Islands Freedom of Information Law. She was in charge of developing an implementation plan for the Cayman Islands, creation of an information manager’s network, development of appropriate IT systems and appropriate administrative regulations. She also worked with The Carter Center as Field Representative in Jamaica working on their Access to Information Project. As part of the Carter Center Access to Information project she was involved in the development of materials, conduct of research and analysis on legal and policy issues associated with the right to information and acted as the Secretariat to the Volunteer Attorneys Panel, a panel of lawyers who provide pro bono services to civil society organizations and indigent persons. Carole is an Attorney-at-law with a LLB from the University of the West Indies and Certificate of Legal Education from the Norman Manley Law School, Mona. She has a Masters Degree in Environmental Law from the University of Aberdeen in Scotland. She has seven years working experience working for the Government of Jamaica on environmental and planning issues both at the Natural Resources Conservation Authority and then at its successor the National Environment and Planning Agency.

Elizabeth Moses
Elizabeth is a Research Analyst with WRI’s Access Initiative where she conducts research and analysis on a variety of policy matters related to access to information, public participation, and access to justice. Her work currently includes empowering communities in Indonesia and Mongolia to improve their environmental health through the use of their rights to access information. She also works to expand opportunities for public participation in the concession permitting process in Indonesia. Prior to working at WRI, Elizabeth was an Organizer and Policy Analyst for the Industrial Toxics Project at the Washington Toxics Coalition. He work focused on researching and writing about Washington State’s polluting industries and the public health and environmental impacts from industrial pollution, as well as providing policy recommendations to state and federal regulators, policy leaders and concerned citizens. Elizabeth holds a Masters of Public Administration from the University of Washington and B.S. degrees in Psychology and Biology from Syracuse University.          

Pier Mantovani
Pier Mantovani is a lead water and sanitation specialist, currently serving clients in Nigeria, Bulgaria, Egypt and Mauritania. In his 12 years at the World Bank he has enjoyed leading teams in water policy development, institutional reform and infrastructure programs in the MNA, ECA and AFR regions. Pier has been TTL for a GPSA-funded  project implemented by Oxfam in Tajikistan for “Improving Social Accountability in Water Services”.  Pier’s prior experience spanned 20 years of engineering-consulting and utility management responsibilities in Europe, Africa and the Americas. He holds engineering degrees from the University of Wisconsin and Ecole Centrale de Paris.  

Marcos Mendiburu
Marcos Mendiburu is a Senior Social Development Specialist at the World Bank. His areas of expertise include transparency, citizen participation and accountability reforms. Within the broader framework of promoting governance reforms, he has focused on initiatives fostering access to public information through policy dialogue, technical assistance, and knowledge and learning in Latin America, South Asia and the Middle East and North Africa, including managing the IDF component concerning the setup of the Latin American Network of Access to Information Oversight Bodies (RTA). Additionally he supports World Bank efforts in support of the Open Government Partnership (OGP), particularly around knowledge exchange and support to country engagement, as well as he contributes to the Knowledge Component of the Global Partnership for Social Accountability (GPSA), which explores the collaboration between CSO efforts on social accountability and horizontal accountability institutions. Marcos earned a Masters’ degree in Public and International Affairs, with a major in Economic and Social Development from GSPIA, University of Pittsburgh. He also pursued graduate studies in International Relations in Argentina, at the Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales (FLACSO), where he also worked for approximately five years.